How can Amtrak improve accessibility?

Charlie Hamilton, NARP Council Rep. at Large (WA), is part of a team asking for input from us and others on the topic of Amtrak trains, stations, and passenger services being ADA compliant for those traveling passengers that may have limited mobility or other physical disabilities. These items can also include concerns that have been addressed through current ADA guidelines but which could be improved.

For example, Stephanie Weber, NARP Council Rep. (WA), offered the concern of passengers with impaired hearing having a difficult time understanding station announcements given by Amtrak employees. Also, there are stations that don’t have a visual train status information board for those to read that are unable to hear a PA system.

At your earliest convenience, if you have ADA topics relating to Amtrak trains, stations, and services offered that should be addressed, please contact us. Be specific so Charlie can accurately present your suggestions/concerns.  Should you have any questions, please contact Charlie Hamilton.

UPDATE: Thanks so much for everyone’s continued input. We are collecting comments here, and in a number of other locations:

Amtrak Unlimited
http://discuss.amtraktrains.com/index.php?/topic/69449-how-can-amtrak-improve-accessibility/

Amtrak Fans on Facebook
https://www.facebook.com/groups/AmtrakFansGroup/permalink/697139910463687/

@AmtrakFansNews on Twitter

Deaf and Hard of Hearing Amtrak Riders on Facebook
https://www.facebook.com/groups/AmtrakDeafHOH/permalink/388955888116149/

The trains are still running

January will see a new team in the White House. The Congress will still be divided. There haven’t been too many changes in state legislatures.

And the trains will still be running.

But now more than ever, we all need to work together to build bipartisan support for a robust passenger train network. Please join, donate to, and become actively involved in, the National Association of Railroad Passengers, and rail advocacy groups in your area.

And there are many other ways to help.

Trains don’t grow on trees. With your help, we can keep them running!

Vote for rail supporters at all levels

For now, seven races shift toward Democrats:

Florida’s 7th District (John L. Mica, R) from Tilts Republican to Tossup

Representative Mica (R-FL7) has been known for micro-managing Amtrak for several years, but he is now facing a real struggle in his bid for re-election.

The National Association of Railroad Passengers has a list of local transit measures on their website here, but they can’t endorse candidates because of their 501(c)(3) nonprofit status. If anyone knows of candidates who are worthy of endorsement by passenger rail supporters, please post them here or on the Grow Trains Facebook page.

Don’t forget to vote for passenger rail supporters in the Senate, the House, in state legislatures, and locally!

Amtrak employees paid to report passengers to law enforcement

Amtrak employees have a responsibility to report suspicious activities to the appropriate authorities.

But according to the Office of the Inspector General of the US Department of Justice, some transportation employees (including Amtrak employees) have been participating in a poorly-managed Drug Enforcement Agency program that pays “tipsters” for information with very little accountability.

But the report indicates that the DEA is as interested in cash as it is in drugs, thus potentially leading to  questionable searches. It’s well-known in the train-riding community that such incidents happen frequently in certain places.

Balancing passenger safety with the needs of law enforcement is a tricky proposition at best. But this balance needs to be decided upon in the light of day.

Tired of advertising?

Advertising. It’s everywhere.

It was originally about paying newspaper writers, radio and television artists, and bloggers. But today, you and I post our comments and our photos to social media and don’t get paid…unless we work for Facebook, or Twitter, or the other platforms we use.

Sure, it costs big money to run big social media sites.  But maybe it’s time to think smaller.

We’re ready to start our own social media site, just for people who care about rail. 

Here’s the idea. The site will have no advertising. It won’t claim ownership of the text and images you post. It won’t collect and sell your personal information. It won’t have subscriptions.

To pay for the small costs it will take to run the site, we’ll ask those of you who can afford it to provide voluntary donations.

Will you join us?

A good choice, but don’t expect miracles

Amtrak’s announcement that retired Norfolk Southern executive Charles “Wick” Moorman will be the railroad’s next president has been greeted positively.

Railfans immediately started posting their wish lists for Mr. Moorman: resurrection of every route Amtrak ever had; return of old-style elegant food service; and so on…even a steam excursion program similar to Norfolk Southern’s.

Well, dream on. We’re pleased that Amtrak has selected a widely-respected executive. But Mr. Moorman is going to need our help to make our wishes come true. This fall, we need to vote for members of Congress, governors, legislators, and local officials who are willing to fund passenger rail.

So please, ask candidates if they support better trains, and let us know what you find out. Mr. Moorman needs our support.

-CH

Flying more, enjoying it less?

mka-nypI’ve seen a lot of posts like this recently. Train supporters are flying, because Amtrak is just not meeting their needs. Personally, I’m taking trains less and flying more this year.

This is bad news. We need to be making passenger trains more convenient, not less.

So now that the circuses in Cleveland and Philadelphia have done their jobs, it’s time to focus on electing candidates that support better infrastructure.

And we need to find and support candidates running for office at every level — US Congress, governors, state legislators, city and county council members — who recognize the importance of passenger rail.

Do you know candidates like that? Let us know! We’ll build a list of supporters, and share it soon.

Who should Grow Trains support?

Grow Trains is looking for candidates who support passenger rail.

It’s important to have strong supporters of passenger rail at all levels of government. So we’re looking for candidates running for election at any level, and they may be affiliated with any party.

Are you such a candidate, or do you know someone who is? Please tell us by completing the linked form.

We hope to publish a list of candidates we like soon. Thanks for your help!

Passenger rail and the party platforms

Support for passenger rail has always been bipartisan. But in 2016, it is not possible to pretend that “the parties are all alike.” Let’s give credit to conservatives like Senator Wicker (R-MS) who recognize the importance of passenger rail.

But such officials are working against the 2016 Republican platform, which seems to be more about restating conservative talking points than in providing sustainable passenger rail service.

America on the Move

Our country’s investments in transportation and other public construction have traditionally been non-partisan. Everyone agrees on the need for clean water and safe roads, rail, bridges, ports, and airports. President Eisenhower established a tradition of Republican leadership in this regard by championing the creation of the interstate highway system. In recent years, bipartisan cooperation led to major legislation improving the nation’s ports and waterways….

The transportation section of the platform starts well, although anyone who has read the history of the Interstate Highway system knows that while President Eisenhower supported the concept of a national highway network, but was concerned about the details of the proposal.

The current Administration has a different approach. It subordinates civil engineering to social engineering as it pursues an exclusively urban vision of dense housing and government transit. Its ill-named Livability Initiative is meant to “coerce people out of their cars.” …

We could argue that there were decades of policy that supported highways to the exclusion of all other modes. Was that “social engineering” meant to “coerce people out of trains?” As late as the 1950s, passenger rail was the most efficient way to get many places, and that only changed because governments decided they preferred cars over trains. That’s social engineering.

Now we make the same pledge regarding the current problems in transportation policy. We propose to remove from the Highway Trust Fund programs that should not be the business of the federal government.

More than a quarter of the Fund’s spending is diverted from its original purpose. One fifth of its funds are spent on mass transit, an inherently local affair that serves only a small portion of the population, concentrated in six big cities….We propose to phase out the federal transit program…

Many in the Republican party seems to have a distaste for cities. That’s beyond the issues we focus on here, but it should be noted that many Republican lawmakers, especially those representing suburban areas, have been consistent supporters of rail and transit, if only because they feel that the more other people use rail, there will be more room for their own cars on the highways.

[We propose to] reform provisions of the National Environmental Policy Act which can delay and drive up costs for transportation projects.

This is an area where bipartisan support could definitely be found.

We renew our call for repeal of the Davis-Bacon law, which limits employment and drives up construction and maintenance costs for the benefit of unions.

Again, this is beyond the scope of this post, but what about benefits to the workers that unions represent?

Recognizing that, over time, additional revenue will be needed to expand the carrying capacity of roads and bridges, we will remove legal roadblocks to public-private partnership agreements that can save the taxpayers’ money and bring outside investment to meet a community’s needs….

Passenger rail supporters recognize and support the usefulness of public-private partnerships. But history shows us that some sort of subsidy will continue to be needed to maintain and grow the passenger rail network.

Amtrak is an extremely expensive railroad for the American taxpayers, who must subsidize every ticket.

All forms of transportation are subsidized. Taxpayers pay much more for highways than what comes from the Highway Trust Fund. We pay for the air-traffic control system, and we subsidize some very expensive flights through the Essential Air Service program. Why should roads and air service be given preferential treatment over passenger rail?

Amtrak was created in 1970 because the private railroads were no longer willing or able to provide passenger service, and President Nixon recognized that without rail, highways (especially in the Northeast) would be unable to take the additional traffic.

Passenger rail advocates recognize the limitations of Amtrak. But given its chronic underfunding, it’s little short of amazing that it’s done as well as it has for 45+ years. And the level of subsidy it receives has been shrinking steadily.

The federal government should allow private ventures to provide passenger service in the northeast corridor. The same holds true with regard to high-speed and intercity rail across the country.

Provisions for such ventures are already in place, as part of the PRIIA Act. But it should be noted that no private entity will want to operate the Northeast Corridor before a century’s worth of deferred maintenance (like the Hudson River tunnels, the Baltimore tunnels, and many more) have been completed, and even then, some sort of operating subsidy will be needed.

We reaffirm our intention to end federal support for boondoggles like California’s high-speed train to nowhere.

This is not the place to discuss the pros and cons of the California high-speed rail project. Many of us believe that “higher-speed rail,” that is, improvements to existing rail services, would be useful. But it is far from clear that the California project is a boondoggle. The small chunks of Missouri and Kansas interstate that opened in 1956 probably looked like highways to nowhere at the time.

So again, it is unpleasantly clear that the Republican platform is not supportive of passenger rail. Please check with your local candidates, and vote for folks that are more willing to support rail than the national platform is.

-CH

Trains bring people together

In the lounge car, travelers who might not ordinarily come together due to economic, geographic or social stratification suddenly find themselves sharing tables. They are “people you’d never put together, but on a train you can, and it works,” [59-year-old Chicagoan Vivian Lonak, our sleeping-car attendant, who has worked for Amtrak for seven years,] said.

Chugging west on Amtrak, family-style

Why do I work for better trains? Because I believe that bringing people together improves understanding, and understanding makes it easier for all of us to live together on this world we share.

We can no longer accept a world where people travel in their own little bubble cars, ignoring the humans around them. We can no longer accept a world where everyone gets “news” that reinforces pre-existing beliefs.

Haven’t been on a train in a while? Join me and my friends from the National Association of Railroad Passengers. Now is the time!

–CH